20 Things I’ve Learned From Woodworking

 

  • You can spend all day in the shop working, and not produce anything.
  • Sometimes these are your best days.
  • Sharpen, sharpen sharpen. The woodworkers mantra.
  • Never do woodworking angry, agitated or when you need to pee.
  • Relax and take your time.
  • Your projects and your fingers will thank you.
  • If it doesn’t feel safe, it’s probably not.
  • Everyone has a woodworking horror story, scars come with the territory.
  • If you are even slightly squeamish, don’t start this conversation.
  • Nothing hurts as bad as a nasty finish on a well build project.
  • When in doubt, keep sanding.
  • Rejects make great gifts. AKA no one else sees your flaws as well as you do.
  • Tool lust comes with the hobby. Warn your pocketbook early.
  • There will always be something else you need to have.
  • There is always someone who can out spend you.
  • Nothing beats the feeling of a well done project.
  • Except maybe getting paid to do it. AKA Your tool budget just increased.
  • Pushing yourself is half the fun.
  • The other half is the sawdust up your nose.
  • Enjoy yourself. That’s the point, remember?

Author: Peter Brown

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5 thoughts on “20 Things I’ve Learned From Woodworking

  • March 30, 2017 at 5:15 am
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    I love woodworking myself and I’m enjoying a lot of times when working. But I always think of the danger so I’m always careful. You need to ensure your safety as well.

    Reply
  • November 25, 2017 at 8:08 pm
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    Thank you for sharing. I love woodworking and always pay attention to safety features in my work.

    Reply
  • May 12, 2018 at 2:54 pm
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    Peter, my horror stories also made for the best lessons I learnt. I am a fan of yours since the milk jug mallet video. Thanks for the write-up!

    Reply
  • June 25, 2018 at 1:27 am
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    I’ve spoken on the phone with Jim Morgan and I’m just
    blown away by his simple and effective strategy to
    make money using his basic woodworking skills.

    He started his woodworking business with NO capital,
    a few shop tools, and a lot of nerve, in a small
    10×20 foot space and grew it into a 1,400 space in
    the first few months while still remaining as a
    one-person business!
    http://www.woodprofits.com?kslskd547fd

    Reply

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